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veggie basket

We all know that we need to eat more fruit and vegetables but how do we make this happen? The Provincial Health Officer’s Annual Report 2005 called Food, Health and Well-Being in British Columbia has the following suggestions:


Eating at least 5 to 10 servings of vegetables and fruits a day may be the single most important food change most British Columbians can make to improve their health. Some simple ways to do this are:

  • Slicing fresh fruit on breakfast cereal. 
  • Making a yogurt smoothie with three or four fruits.
  • Drinking a low-sodium vegetable drink.
  • Adding spinach to soups and salads.
  • Ordering vegetarian pizza with extra veggies.
  • Washing and preparing celery sticks, carrots, peppers, and other vegetables and storing them in the refrigerator for easy snacking.
  • Freezing 100 per cent juice as popsicles for a frozen treat.
  • Having frozen vegetables on hand and adding them to soups, omelettes, and stirfries.

blueberries

The Provincial Health Officer’s Annual Report 2005 called Food, Health and Well-Being in British Columbia has a great description of what healthy diets have in common. The report states the following:

Many healthy diets share similar features. Recent research has affirmed the traditional Mediterranean diet as one of the ideal styles of eating to promote longevity and a range of health benefits, particularly the prevention of heart disease and a decreased risk of a variety of cancers (Hu, 2003; Trichopoulou, Costacou, Bamia, & Trichopoulos, 2003; Singh et al., 2002).

The traditional Mediterranean diet features:

  • An abundance of unprocessed plant food (fruit, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, seeds, and legumes).
  • Olive oil as the principal fat.
  • Fish and poultry weekly.
  • Red meat once or twice a month.
  • Wine with meals but not to excess.

This diet—high in fibre, low in saturated (animal) fat and trans fats—is very similar to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, and to the recommendations of Canada’s Food Guide to Healthy Eating. With a minimum of processed foods and an abundance of grains, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds, these diets provide a healthy, well-balanced way of eating and are also satisfying to most palates.

April Fitness

A new way for the whole family to exercise has come to town. Test strength, stamina, agility, balance and flexibility in the local forest. A new adventure park opens in Lake Country this summer. While Oyama Zipline has had huge success with their guided zipline tour; this year Peter and Jennifer Madsen will introduce an aerial play park with obstacles suitable for every age. The price-point is very affordable and the attraction is for local families who want an outing with a fitness component. A toddler area is offered and children aged 4 thru 11 have an age-appropriate, supervised area to themselves. Next to this “Little Monkey Play Park” is an aerial challenge course older kids, teens and adults can explore at their own speed. All equipment and ground school training is included. You are clipped-in with state-of-the-art belay system then can climb, jump, and swing your way through the trees. The obstacles start at 5m and get higher (you can choose to add the 60’ freefall quick jump at the end … or take a less scary route). Because this is a self-guided adventure you progress to higher and more difficult obstacles only when you are ready. For more information check out www.oyamazipline.com.

 

April Gardening

Get your plants sprouting faster. With our long growing season you can eat ‘fresh from the garden’ longer than most in Canada. Start the seedlings indoors until the temperatures are stable. A local gardener offered this advice: “Pepper seeds are notoriously difficult to start as they require constant warm temperatures. Tomato seeds also do best with a constant temperature of about 80 degrees F. Some put the seedlings in a warm place like the oven (with the light on) for the night; and give them a place in the sun during the day. When starting seeds try using damp paper towel. This way you can quickly see which of your seeds are still viable. Place a square down, spread seeds on the upper inch, fold the towelette over the seeds and spritz with a mixture of peroxide and water (3% hydrogen peroxide helps kill fungus). If you place this seed-packed towelette in a glass you can create a self-watering system. Put an inch of fresh water in the bottom of the glass each day. Spritz with the peroxide mixture if the top of the paper towel dries and also as a way to cut down on fungus damage. You should see your seeds sprout in about a week. Some pepper varieties take longer so don’t loose heart!”

The Health Hub

We are here to offer you resources and support. Visit us at our physical location, The Health Hub.

Click here for our location and hours.

We acknowledge the financial assistance of the Province of British Columbia.

We acknowledge the financial assistance of the Central Okanagan Foundation.

ABOUT US

The Lake Country Health Planning Society (LCHPS) is a non-profit organization that has been supporting community wellness since 1982.